Filters

To help you get the most from Luminar filters, you’ll find a detailed guide that explains the major features of each. Filters are the core of Luminar, they will help you get the necessary images enhancement and changes in the looks. These are the filters available in Luminar. 

Adjustable Gradient.

The Adjustable Gradient filter allows you to selectively adjust exposure, contrast, vibrance and warmth for 2 different parts of the image. You can adjust the mask orientation for selective adjustments. This effect is very well-suited for adjusting the sky and ground regions in a photo.

This filter in Luminar includes the following controls:

Exposure – Adjusts the luminance of the image. Moving a slider to the left results in a darker image (reduction of exposure value). Moving this slider to the right results in a brighter image (increase of exposure value). You can adjust the relative exposure for both the top and bottom of the image independently to refine an image.

Contrast – Separate contrast controls allow you to modify the amount of contrast at the top and bottom of the image. Contrast is the difference in luminance or color that makes an object in an image distinguishable from another. Practically speaking, contrast is determined by the difference in the color and brightness of an object in relation to other objects within the same field of view.

Vibrance. This slider is a "Smart Saturation” control. In general, its effect is similar to Saturation with the difference that it increases less vibrant colors stronger and has a weaker effect on more vibrant colors. This allows you to get more realistic and less saturated colors the picture. This slider can be used in conjunction with the Saturation to enhance the secondary colors.

Warmth. This slider affects how warm or cool an image appears. A positive value adds warmth while a negative value cools the image.
Blend. The blend control affects how smooth or a transition there is between the top and bottom adjustment. A higher value creates a soft transition while a lower value is more abrupt.

Shift. The shift option moves the transition point between adjustments. By default it is centered top-to-bottom, but this can be raised or lowered in the frame.
Rotation. If your image is angled (or your scene has strong geometric composition) you can rotate the angle of the blending. You’ll find controls to rotate + or - 90˚.

Advanced Contrast.

Precisely adjusts tonal contrast with six distinct controls spanning highlights, midtones and shadows, making for more detailed results. Use the Highlights, Midtones, and Shadows sliders to refine the amount of contrast in each zone. Dragging to the right increases contrast. Use the three Middle sliders to define the midpoint for each zone. This allows you to refine which area is treated as a Shadow, Midtone, and Highlight.

Black & White Conversion.

The B&W Conversion filter converts a color photo to black & white. It also contains a number of controls to manipulate the monochrome look.

Color Filter. Six Color Filters are available which act similar to glass filters that are placed in front of a camera lens. Neutral, red, orange, yellow, green and blue. Each

Color Filter. When applied will brighten that specific color and darken the opposite color on the color spectrum. For example: Red is often used to brighten skin tones (red) and the darken skies (blue).

Luminance. Color sliders control the brightness of each relative color as it is converted from color to black and white.

Saturation. Each Color slider will introduce the respective color that was present within the original color image back into the black and white image.

Exposure. Controls the overall luminance value throughout the image. Adding exposure brightens the image while removing exposure darkens the image.

Contrast. Controls the differences in the relationships of tonal values. Adding contrast increases the difference between the highlights, midtones, and shadows. Removing contrast decreases the difference between these tonal values, “flattening” these relationships.

Highlights. Luminance control of the brighter values in the image, basically affecting the tones on the right side of the histogram independently from the darker values.

Shadows. Luminance control of the darker values in the image, basically affects the tones on the left side of the histogram independently from the brighter values.

Whites. Very specific luminance control over the brightest values within the image, really only affecting the tones that lie within the far right of the histogram.

Blacks. Very specific luminance control over the darkest values within the image, really only affecting the tones that lie within the far left of the histogram.

Clarity. Allows users to increase the contrast in the midtones introducing more depth between the relationships of values that lie in the middle of the histogram.

Details. Increases image details globally or in highlights and shadows.

Bi-Color Toning.

This filter simulates a traditional glass bi-color filter. It uses two colors and a soft transition to tone the image. This is a good choice for enhancing seascapes and landscape photos.

Amount. This controls the intensity of the filter. Overall, how strong the colors are. 

Top Color. This is the color used at the top of the frame. This will usually be a shad of blue or purple for the sky.

Bottom Color. Use this color to control the landscape or water color.

Blend. The blend control affects how smooth or a transition there is between the top and bottom adjustment. A higher value creates a soft transition while a lower value is more abrupt.

Shift. The shift option moves the transition point between adjustments. By default it is centered top-to-bottom, but this can be raised or lowered in the frame.

Rotation. If your image is angled (or your scene has strong geometric composition) you can rotate the angle of the blending. You’ll find controls to rotate + or - 90˚.

Brightness/Contrast.

This is a basic filter which adjusts the overall lightness or darkness of an image (brightness) and the difference in brightness between areas and objects (contrast). This filter is easy to understand and works well for new users. For more advanced results consider using the Tone filter.

Channel Mixer.

Digital images are comprised of Red, Green, and Blue information. These components are called channels and if they are not balanced properly an image can show color casts. By modifying channels you can choose to emphasize or deemphasize certain details. The Channel Mixer filter allows fine-tuning adjustments and mixing of the Red, Green and Blue color channels (RGB) to create highly customized images. Many users will also use the effect in combination with their black & white conversions workflows.

Red/Green/Blue. Use the tabs to switch between each color channel.

Red. Influences the balance of Red details.

Green. Influences the balance of Green details.

Blue. Influences the balance of Blue details.

Constant. Adds a global amount of influence to the entire channel.

Clarity.

Adjusts the overall image clarity. By increasing the value of the slider, the number of visible details increases. If values are much larger, halos may appear on the contrast edges of the image. A best practice is to not raise the value of the slider above 50.

Сolor Balance.

The Color Balance filter is useful to change the overall mixture of colors in an image for general color correction. It can also be used for creative control within different tonal regions of an image.

Tone. Choose the region to adjust. You can select Shadows, Midtones, and Highlights.

Color Balance Sliders. Adjust the balance of Cyan-Red, Magenta-Green, and Yellow-Blue to emphasize certain colors in each tonal region.  

Color Contrast.

This filter lets you choose a color range to which to apply contrast. The color selected will cause objects of that color to become lighter, while opposite colors on color wheel will become darker. This effect can help make flat images pop based on the colors in the image.

Hue. Chooses the target Hue for emphasis.

Color Contrast. Color contrast specifically refers to contrast that is created between differences based on colors (vs. luminance). The strongest is the more contrast between primary and secondary colors.

Brightness. The overall lightness or darkness of the image is controlled with this slider.

Contrast. This slider emphasizes the difference in brightness between areas and objects. 

Color Temperature.

This filter modifies the color temperature of the photo, making it cooler (more blue) or warmer (more orange). It helps you fix incorrect color temperature on your photos and for RAW files includes white balance presets in the drop down menu. Those presets are: Daylight, Cloudy, Shade, Tungsten, Fluorescent and Flash.

For more customized results, use the new Eyedropper tool to select the closest tone to pure white, pure black or 18% neutral grey (by selecting the tool and clicking on a desired tonal value in the image). This will set the reference point and more accurately adjust the color temperature and tint.

Check out the Luminar video:

Сross Processing.

Reproduces a color cross-processing effect once commonly used in developing film to create unnatural color and interesting contrast shifts.

Type. Using the drop down list to choose a color palette preset inspired by various international cities.

Amount. Drag the amount slider to affect how strong the cross processing effect is.

Сurves.

One of the most powerful tools for adjusting tones to brighten, darken, add contrast and shift colors. Curves can usually be applied to all channels together in an image, or to each channel individually. Curves can help you manually fine-tune the brightness and contrast of the image.

Most users will either use Curves a lot or they won’t use it at all. The Curves interface is a bit complex and allows for up to 10 control points. This can significantly open up more options when adjusting color and exposure. The primary advantage of Curves is that you have precise control over which points get mapped for tonal adjustment.

Tabs. You can make a curve adjustment to all channels equally or to an individual channel (such as to blue to emphasize the sky).

Sliders. At the bottom there are sliders that let you adjust black and white points of the histogram (the leftmost and rightmost sliders), as well as the middle bend of the curve (the central slider).

Points. You can add up to 10 control points. Drag up to add contrast to an area and down to lighten the area. Multiple points can be employed for contrast adjustments based on tonal range.

Dehaze.

The Dehaze filter helps you eliminate the effects of fog and haze often found in cityscape or aerial photos by using a proprietary blend of contrast, clarity and color adjustments. This filter can also be helpful when editing photos shot through a glass window. Refine the effect using the Amount slider. 

Watch a Luminar video:

Details Enhancer.

The Details Enhancer filter helps you create dramatic photos and brings crystal-clear sharpness to your images. With the proper detail enhancement, you can make your photos look great and sharp with no halos or extra artifacts. 

Small. Small sets sharpness of fine details. At 0, the effect is not applied. Moving the slider to the right will intensify the clarity of small details, while moving to the left, on the contrary, will somewhat wash out the fine details.

Medium. This option sets medium-sized parts sharpness. At 0, the effect is not applied. Moving the slider to the right increases the sharpness, while moving the slider to the left decreases it.

Large. Use this choice to set sharpness of global contours of objects in the image. At 0, the effect is not applied. Moving the slider to the right increases the sharpness, while moving to the left decreases it.

Highlight Protection. To ensure that the brighter areas of the image aren’t over-processed use the Highlight Protection slider.

Masking. Try the Masking slider to control the zone of detail amplification. When moving the slider to the left, the number of zones increases and the image becomes more detailed. When moving to the right, the number of granularity zones is reduced. Optimal masking comes from a setting in the range from 30 to 70.

Dramatic.

The Dramatic filter is a creative filter that lowers saturation and increases contrast, helping to achieve a gritty cinematic look in your photos, similar to the darkroom technique “Bleach Bypass.” It is often used in stylized fashion shoots, urban images, or grungy athletic portraits.

Amount. The Amount slider controls the total intensity of the added effect.

Contrast. Controls the differences in the relationships of tonal values. Adding contrast increases the difference between the highlights, midtones, and shadows.

Local Contrast. Adds a more targeted contrast adjustment to the finer details of the image.

Brightness. Darkens or lightens details in the image. Often useful for bringing out details in areas like skies.

Saturation. Controls whether colors become washed out or more saturated.

Exposure.

A simple filter to adjust the overall Exposure of the image. This filter only offers one slider. For more control consider using the Tone filter. After adjusting the Exposure filter you may need to use a Saturation/Vibrance filter. Increasing exposure will desaturate the image. Decreasing exposure will boost the saturation.

Fog.

Allows you to add a strong softening or blurring effect to part of your photo, simulating the high humidity weather phenomenon commonly known as “Fog”. You can add Light Fog or Dark Fog to an image and adjust its intensity with the Amount slider. 

Foliage Enhancer.

Enhances the colors of foliage and greenery automatically, making them more vivid and natural. A good choice for nature and lush landscape images.

Hue. Modifies the hue of the affected foliage. Useful to dial in the right amount of green.

Amount. This controls how strong the adjustment is for the image.

Golden Hour.

This filter introduces a warmed-tone sunlight effect to your photos, emulating shooting conditions taken when he sun is low on the horizon shortly after sunrise or before sunset. This indirect light helps make even dull photos warmer, software and more dimensional. Dial in the amount of warm toning using the Amount slider and use the Saturation slider to introduce even more overall color vibrancy. 

Watch a Luminar video.

Grain.

Emulates the structure of analog film stock by introducing a random, stylized grain into your image. Keep in mind that grain and photo noise are different things. Use grain to give your color and black & white photos a cool analog feel. Refine the look of grain using the Amount slider to control how present the grain is. Use Size and Roughness to control its shape and appearance.

High Key.

Emulates the look of a high key lighting set-up where the main light source slightly overexposes the subject. This produces bright high contrast images. Often used in Fashion & Beauty photography. 

Amount. How much of the effect is added to the image.

Glow. Controls the behavior of the brighter areas of a photo.

Standard High Key. Affects the image in a global fashion.

Dynamic High Key. Is more limited in its effect, taking skin tones into account as it applies the filter to the image.

Saturation. Determines if the overall colors become washed-out or stay richly-saturated.

Black. Maintains contrast in the darkest areas.

Contrast. Impacts the overall contrast in the image (the relative difference between the lightest and darkest areas).

Highlights/Shadows. 

Provides adjustment for highlight and shadow by changing the brightness of each region independently. You’ll often need to combine this filter with a Saturation/Vibrance adjustment to restore washed-out color in recovered areas.

Highlights. Adjusts the brightness of the brightest areas of the image. Moving the slider to the right cause very bright areas to become brighter, while moving the slider to the left, makes them darker.

Shadows. Adjusts the brightness level of the darkest areas of the image. Moving the slider to the right will cause such areas to become brighter and additional details will appear. When moving to the left, such areas become darker, and the number of shadow areas in the image generally increases.

HSL.

Selectively adjusts Hue (color), Saturation (color purity), and Luminance (intensity) of individual colors in the image for color correction to balance tones and explore creative possibilities. Allows you to create unique looks with selective coloring.There are 3 tabs present in the Color Filter panel.

Hue. A set of sliders to adjust the hue or basic color shades of your image. Sliding the control further to the right results in a more intense hue.

Saturation. A set of sliders to adjust color saturation. Sliding the control further to the right results in a more intense color. Of course, moving to the left removes color to the point where -100 will make the image appear black and white.

Luminance. A set of sliders to adjust the brightness of the colors. Sliding the control further to the right results in a brighter color within the image. The further to the left, the darker the image.

Image Radiance.

This filter provides for an overall “dreamy” look to your image by softening image luminescence, and increasing contrast & saturation. It can create a dreamy, fantasy look for photos by increasing contrast and adding a creative glow, prioritized to the lighter areas of the image.

Amount. The overall effect strength. For a moderate effect and a more realistic image, keep the values in the Amount to +40. If the Amount value is 0, then the effect is not applied. Move the slider to the right to increase Amount.

Smoothness. This controls the softness of the effect.

Brightness. Use this slider to control the brightness of the effect.

Smart Colorize. A useful way to adjust the color saturation of the effect applied to the image.

Warmth. Adjusts the hue of the effect towards the warm end of the scale.

NOTE: At a low setting, this effect will give the image more contrast and can increase color in the image. Use the Smart Colorize slider for better control.

Micro Structure.

Improves the sharpening of your image in small areas of fine detail and texture. Advanced parameters allow you to fine tune this subtle yet dramatic effect. Use this tool to get some creative, HDR-like effects. Use the Amount slider to control how much structure is added and the Smoothness slider to better blend the increased details and avoid hard edges.

Orton Effect.

The Orton Effect allows enhancements to an image that includes glow and focus which produces photos that are sharp and blurry at the same time. This is a great way to add a unique look to your photos. Type: They Type pop-up menu offers two choices. Type 1 increases the Saturation of the image while Type 2 is a softer glow.

Amount. Controls the overall strength of the effect.

Softness. Choose whether you want the effect to blend gently or have more defined edges.

Brightness. This control can raise the luminance values of the entire image.

Contrast. Use this to maintain a crisper difference between the light and dark areas of the photo. This is a useful way to create rich blacks and bright whites.

Saturation. Controls the intensity of colors in the affected image.

Photo Filter. 

This filter simulates color filters that traditionally are attached to a camera lens. Professional photographers often place glass filters in front of the camera lens to “cool” or “warm” a picture, or to add special effects. These can also be used to accentuate complementary colors, and add creative toning to your photos.

Amount. Controls how much of the colored filter is added to the image.

Hue. Sets the color value for the photo filter.

Saturation. Controls the intensity of the color added to the image.

Save Luminosity. This option prevents the overall exposure of the image from changing. It is useful for most cases and generally be turned on.

Polarizing Filter.

On a camera, a polarizing filter can provide more color depth and cut atmospheric haze, resulting in richer, bluer skies. The same holds true with the Polarizing Filter in Luminar. The effect will produce deeper blue skies and more contrast in clouds. With a light touch of this filter, almost any landscape image can be improved.

NOTE: It is not recommended to use this tool on night photos or images with no sky in them. Most times, keeping the effect intensity under +50 will yield the best results.

Remove Color Cast.

Automatically removes undesirable color casts in your images by detecting and adjusting the hue. You can also make manual adjustments to fine tune the result.
Method. There are three methods to choose from. Two are automatic that attempt to determine color cast. The other lets you manually adjust the Hue.

Amount. This slider is the amount of correction.

Color. Adds color back to the image that can be used to correct color cast. If overdone, a new cast is added.

Saturation/Vibrance.

This filter is a useful way to control the Intensity of colors in a photo. It is often used in conjunction with Exposure or Tone adjustments.

Saturation. This slider adjusts the intensity of all colors in your photo. 

Vibrance. This slider adjusts only the intensity of muted colors, ignoring well-saturated colors. This is useful for finer control when adjusting color.

Sharpening.

The Sharpening Filter helps focus soft edges in a photo to increase clarity or focus. Use this tool to significantly improve image quality. Keep in mind that too much sharpening can give your photo a grainy look. Please note: on most screens sharpening results are best seen at 100% Zoom (or more).

Amount. Effect of the micro sharpness applied to the image.

Radius. Distance away from contrast edges that the effect is applied.

Masking. The dynamic masking feature allows you to reveal details only in appropriate areas and can help you define the sharpness in your image.

Soft Focus. 

This filter emulates a soft focus lens effect or diffusion material placed across your lens. It is perfect for adding a creative glow to portrait and wedding photos.

Type. Use the pop-up menu to choose from two styles of an effect.

Amount. The Amount slider controls the intensity of the filter.

Brightness. Use this slider to increase the relative exposure of the photo.

Soft Glow.

This effect us useful for creating a lighting effect in photos. It is especially useful for bright areas in your image such as streetlights or sky.

Amount. The overall effect strength. If the Amount value is 0, then the effect is not applied. Move the slider to the right to increase Amount.

Smoothness. This controls the softness of the effect. A Higher value creates a gentler blend between the affected and unaffected areas of the image.

Brightness. Use this slider to control the brightness of the effect.

Warmth. Adjusts the hue of the effect towards the warm end of the scale.

Split Color Warmth. 

This filter can be used to selectively enhances cool and warm tones in your image. Allows you to get increased color contrast and vibrancy or create creative toning effects. You can separately adjust the Warm Colors and Cool Colors. Drag to the left to reduce Saturation in a target and to the right to add Saturation.

Split Toning. 

A powerful creative tool, Split Toning offers the ability to introduce color toning to black and white images. Toning a black and white image can transform the mood of the resulting image and also help in some printing processes.

Amount. The overall strength of color toning applied to an image.

Highlights Hue. Scroll through a spectrum of colors to choose the toning of the bright values in a scene.

Highlights Saturation. This increase the intensity of the color in the light area of the image.

Protection - Preserves white in the brightest highlights in an image.


Shadows. Shadow Hue. Scroll through a spectrum of colors to choose the toning of the darker values. Shadow Saturation. Increase the intensity of the color in the dark areas of the image.

Balance. Shifts the balance between what is considered and affected by the Highlights adjustments and the Shadows adjustments of Split Toning. Slide to the left and the adjustments made to the Shadows will take precedent, slide to the right, the adjustments made to the Highlights will take precedent.

Structure.

This tool allows adjusting of image detail and clarity. Using this tool you can get a classic HDR effect with great detail or get a smoother picture with less detail. This is the main tool to increase contrast of the image and visualize more details in the image.

Amount. The strength of the effect. By moving the slider to the right, the amount of visible detail in the image increases. Moving the slider to the left will cause the image to lose detail and flatten. The “zero state” in the middle means that the amount is not applied by default.

Softness. Controls the overall softness of structure and textures in the image. Moving the slider to the left will cause parts of the image to become less smooth and more unrealistic. This produces the so-called classic view of the HDR effect. Moving the slider to the right, on the contrary, the details become more global and the image is more realistic. This is a very useful slider to adjust realistic details.

Boost. Adjusts the overall display of details. When moving the slider to the left, the images will become more realistic and “calm." Moving the slider to the right will accentuate details and make the image more unrealistic.

Texture Overlay.

Enables custom images and textures to be blended as a layer into the current image. Textures can easily give your photos new unique looks, especially when you’re trying to achieve a vintage or grungy look.

Select Texture. Click the Select Texture button to open a file browser. You’ll be able to choose a texture image on your hard drive.

Blend Mode. Use a Blending Mode to change how the texture mixes with your image.

  • Multiply. Blends the lighter colors of the texture overlay leaving the darks.
  • Screen. Blends the darker colors of the texture overlay leaving the brighter areas.
  • Soft Light. Gently mixes the texture layer.
  • Overlay. A stronger mix of texture and photo.

Amount. Use the Amount slider to control how the image lightens or darkens based upon the texture layer.

Tone. 

The Tone effect is the most precise way to adjust overall brightness and contrast. It helps to provide tonal balance and a unique signature style to your photos. Tone is one of the most important filters to give your photos a style all their own. 

Exposure. Adjusts the global luminance of the image. Moving this slider to the left results in a darker image (reduction of exposure value). Moving this slider to the right results in a brighter image (increase of exposure value).

Contrast. Adjusts the contrast of the image. Contrast is the difference in luminance or color that makes an object in an image distinguishable from another. Practically speaking, contrast is determined by the difference in the color and brightness of an object in relation to other objects within the same field of view.

Smart Tone. This slider adjusts the overall brightness of image properly. When moving to the right, the image is more vivid, but it does not work when bright areas become white, as in the ordinary exposure. And when you move the slider to the left, the image becomes darker but there are no completely black areas. This is a very powerful and balanced image brightness tool.

Highlights. Adjusts the brightness of the brightest areas of the image. Moving the slider to the right cause very bright areas to become brighter, while moving the slider to the left, makes them darker.

Shadows. Adjusts the brightness level of the darkest areas of the image. Moving the slider to the right will cause such areas to become brighter and additional details will appear. When moving to the left, such areas become darker, and the number of shadow areas in the image generally increases. 

Whites. Adjusts the white point of the histogram and white tones in the image. When moving to the right, the brightest tones will become brighter while the histogram stretches to the right. Moving the slider to the left will cause white tones in the image to become darker and the histogram to compress to the left.

Blacks. Sets the black point of the histogram or black tones in the image. Moving the slider to the right, black tones become brighter and the histogram compresses to the right. Moving the slider to the left, black become darker and the histogram stretches to the left. 

A recommended workflow is to start with a light touch with Exposure and Contrast, then Smart Tone. Then proceed to setting Shadows and Highlights and finally fine tune the contrast of the image using the Whites and Blacks sliders.

NOTE: Whites and Blacks can be used to fine-tune of contrast of the image.
Strong raised Shadows can lead to a strong dark areas and loss of contrast.

Top & Bottom Lighting.

This filter allows selective adjustment of lighting for the top and bottom parts of the image. Controls permit shifting the transition area, rotation angle and blending gradient. This effect is widely used in landscape or architecture photography with a distinct horizon. 

The effect is flexible and separately controls the brightness and other aspects of the top and bottom of the image. This enables you, for example, to lower the brightness of the sky and raise the brightness of the foreground. Thus, your image can be significantly improved without resorting to creating layers and masking.

Top. Controls the brightness of the top of the image. Moving the slider to the left will make it darker and to the right brighter.

Bottom. Controls the brightness of the bottom of the image. Moving the slider to the left will make it darker and to the right brighter.

Blend. The transition between the Top & Bottom. Moving the slider to the right will increase the Blend value, making the transition between the values of Top to Bottom wider. Moving the slider more to the left will decrease the blend value creating a sharp transition between Top and Bottom. Handy guidelines will appear on your image to visually show you the transition blends.

Shift. Using this slider will adjust the vertical location of the transition zone between Top and Bottom in the photo.

Rotation. Moving this slider rotates the transition zone.

NOTE: This is a powerful tool for fine-tuning of colors in the image as well as a means for creative image processing. It is found in several other popular photo apps such as Adobe Lightroom. 

Examples of using this tool: The sky is mostly blue in photos. Therefore, lowering the brightness of blue colors in the image can cause more dark and deep blue of the sky.

Vignette.

A Vignette darkens or lightens the edges of your image. This is quite an old technique to emphasize the accents on photos. The effect typically leaves the central area unaffected while the edges are shaded or lightened.

Amount. Strengthens the darkening around the edges of photos. In position 0, the effect is not applied. Move the slider to the left side of the picture to give more shading to the edges, while moving the slider to right will brighten the edges.

Size. Size of the obscured area. Moving the slider to the left will increase the area of darkening. Moving the slider to the right will reduce the area of darkening.

Roundness. This slider changes the shape of the shaded area.

Feather. This slider sets the smoothness of the transition between the area of shading.

Inner Brightness. This slider increases the brightness in the central region which is not affected by shading. It allows you to create a contrast effect.

NOTE: This tool allows you to highlight key points in the photo, making it more interesting. A slight edge shading always provokes the viewer's eye to consider the lighter central part of the photo. 

For a realistic picture, don’t lower the Amount below -50. As a rule, this effect is used only with darker shading. Highlights are rarely used except for some vintage looks.

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